What is the Type 2 Diabetes Life Expectancy?

Will Type 2 Diabetes Shorten My Life?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. There is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2014 and in the United States, the average life expectancy at birth for males was 76.4 years. For females, it was 81.2 years.

Type 2 diabetes is a complex condition with many variables. At the time of diagnosis, the doctor will not be able to tell how the condition will affect a person’s life expectancy.

A 2010 report from the United Kingdom estimated that type 2 diabetes reduced life expectancy by up to 10 years, while type 1 diabetes reduced it by at least 20 years, on average.

A 2012 Canadian study calculated the effects of diabetes on life expectancy at 55 years of age. They found that the disease caused an average reduction of 6 years in females and 5 years in males.

. It is important to note that the CDC figures do not distinguish between types of diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy.

The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease.

CDC research also showed that 25 people in every 100,000 died from causes related to diabetes in 2000. By 2014, the same figure fell to about 21 people in every 100,000.

They noted that diabetes was the seventh most common cause of death in the U.S

In 2015, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that the following could reduce the risk of death linked to type 2 diabetes:

The range of estimated life expectancies is wide, depending on a person’s age, lifestyle factors, and treatments.

screening
medications
better awareness
The European Heart Journal published, in 2008, a study that estimated outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes and the effects of intervention methods, such as lifestyle changes and medications.

At that time:

A 55-year-old male with type 2 diabetes could expect to live for another 13.2– 21.1 years, while the general expectancy would be another 24.7 years.
A 75-year-old male with the disease might expect to live for another 4.3– 9.6 years, compared with the general expectancy of another 10 years.
These findings and figures reflect:

There is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. It is important to note that the CDC figures do not distinguish between types of diabetes.

how varied life expectancy is for people with diabetes
how this estimation can change, depending on medical intervention
A person who does not manage their glucose levels effectively, who smokes, and who does not exercise likely has a shorter life expectancy than a person with a healthful, active lifestyle, who does not smoke and who maintains stable blood glucose levels.

In 2017, the American Diabetes Association noted in a report on standards of care that diabetes is a “complex, chronic illness requiring continuous medical care with multifactorial risk-reduction strategies beyond glycemic control.”

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy.

While new medications and screening techniques continue to improve diagnostics and treatment, a move toward personalized strategies is also underway. These can all contribute to a better outlook for people with diabetes.

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